Tag Archives: Garden District

New Orleans, Louisiana – Garden District – E. Burton White, Jr. House

1 Dec

At one time this house was known as the E. Burton White Jr. home. It is located in the historic Garden District of New Orleans, Louisiana.

The Garden District has a very interesting history and it is always a pleasure to learn more about this historic and unique treasure.  It is always a pleasure to stroll this area of town and to photograph the beautiful homes and yards. It is as much park like as it is residential.

New Orleans is a very historic city and the Garden District certainly contributes to that designation. Because of the old system of filing many legal transactions by the notary it can be challenging to discover the important things about a structure or about a person.   I think that most of the homes in the Garden District have stories to tell and it is always interesting to know some of the history.  If one sees a beautiful home it feels good to know the name, if it has one, or maybe the families that have lived there.

I’m not interested in a detailed history of most homes but I always like to know a little information about any building that I photograph. I have purchased several books on the Garden District, and New Orleans, but even with those it is difficult to learn the history of one of the homes.  Somehow I discovered that one of the beautiful homes, in the Garden District, that I had photographed was called “The White House.”  It could be called something else these days or in times past but there is a description of this home in “The Great Days of the Garden District,” by Martha and Ray Samuel. The information was published by “The Parent’s League of the Louise S. McGehee School.” In this booklet the structure is referred to as the “E. Burton White, Jr. House.”  So the home is/was known for one of its owners – not the color of the house.

E. Burton White, Jr. appears to have been a medical doctor in New Orleans.  I have found information on him by doing searches on the Internet.  From what I have found he is now deceased but I have found other sources that do not make this clear.  At the time that the Garden District book was written Dr. White was the owner and resident of the house. The “White House” which is not the color white is good enough for me.

The above publication says that records of 1877 show the house advertised as a “raised cottage facing Chestnut Street.”  In 1878 a renovation took place in which the entry of the home was moved to First Street and the cottage was raised even higher. A new first story was constructed and the old first floor was moved to the second story and a new facade was constructed.  Bays were added to both floors.

The original construction of this structure is believed to have taken place in 1849. It was a typical Louisiana cottage with a gallery across the front, having a wide center hall with two large rooms, on either side, and two additional bedrooms in the “attic like” second floor.

Sometime after the 1878 renovation the house was converted into three apartments. When the publication was printed in was stated that the present owners were in the process of converting the structure back to a single family dwelling.

Today the home is a beautiful structure that adds its character to the Garden District.  It is hard to picture this home being located anywhere else! Oh, if you have a few million bucks to spare you can purchase this house – it is for sale. It has five bedrooms and five baths and is 6,751 square ft. in size.

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New Orleans, Louisiana – Garden District – Homes

15 Aug

One of my favorite places to visit in order to stroll the streets and to take photographs is in the Historic Garden District of New Orleans.  Let me quantify that statement by saying when the weather is to my liking.  My favorite visiting time is in the fall and through the spring.  The homes here are beautiful and the hard light in summer just washes out the color, so you never capture the beauty seen by your eyes.  My intention is to make posts about some of these individual houses and to discuss their history and significance in more detail. At the moment I have beaucoup of photos of the Garden District and so I am posting some of them without any discussion – in reality they need none.

New Orleans, Louisiana – Streetcars – St. Charles Line

1 Jul

St. Charles Line in the neutral ground between Audubon Park and Tulane

New Orleans is noted for its historic streetcars and streetcar lines.  I have heard them rumble by and there is even a historic roar on the tracks as they pass.  In many places the neutral ground is filled with people jogging or walking.  The green of the neutral ground and the people project a park like setting in which the streetcars rumble up and down St. Charles Avenue and out Carrollton.

Passengers Getting in Streetcar on St. Charles

One of the first family stories that I remember about the St. Charles line happened when I was a baby.  Somehow I managed to kick my shoes off and they sailed out the window of the streetcar. This was not funny to my mother.  In fact, 50 years later, I am compelled to look for those shoes every time I am in New Orleans.

Later I worked for a stint in New Orleans and took the St, Charles line in to work everyday.  It was something that I always enjoyed .  The people, the cars and the atmosphere associated with the whole thing.  It was a part of history.

Historical Marker on Carrollton

On Carrollton Street there is a historic marker that says that the Carrollton Street Car line in the oldest continuous streetcar line in the U.S.  That is true but the Cable Car in San Francisco and the Trolley in New York both predate the New Orleans system by a few years.  Still New Orleans can claim that it was the second city in the nation to have a street car system and that it has the oldest continuously operated line in the world with the St. Charles and Carrollton line.

Historic Streetcar with Mahogany Seats Carries 52 Passengers

The cars in use today are the still “Arch Roof” type designed by Mr. Perley A. Thomas and built by the Brill and Perley Thomas Car Companies in 1922-24.  These double trunk cars are 47’8″ in width, and 11’4″ in height.  The exteriors retain their traditional (since 1899) colors of olive green and cream trim and iron red window and door frames.  The interiors are fitted with wooden seats that seat 52 passengers.  The cars can be operated in either direction with controls in the vestibule at each end of the car.  The cars have been completely refurbished by New Orleans Public Service Incorporated (NOPSI) and presently in good condition.

The Bed of the Tracks is Underground Putting the Rails at Ground Level

There is a “roadbed” for the tracks but it is all underground.  Therefore the tracks and neutral ground traversed by cars that were pulled by mules and then powered by steam and then by electricity still appear very much like they did originally.  In the September 30, 1835 issue of the New Orleans Bee the 25 cent ride was described.

“The route passes through a level and beautiful country; Very high, (About six feet above Canal Street), dry and arable lands – and affording one of the most pleasant drives in the Southern States.  It passes through the limits of an ancient forest of Live Oaks; Peculiarly interesting as being one of the very few of its kind now remaining in the South.”

St. Charles Line Cars on Canal Before Canal Line Cars Started the Route After Hurricane Katrina

In 1866, General P.G.T. Beauregard, C.S.A., and Associates leased the N.O. & C. R.R. Co., and Beauregard served as an innovative president for almost 10 years.  The constant improvements and increased efficiency under his management were reflected in the value of the Company’s stock which rose from $7.50 per share in 1865 to $110.00 per share by the early 1870s.

Car 900 Heads Uptown on the Historic St. Charles Line

For a 125 years streetcars have been an integral part of travel in New Orleans.  Today the St. Charles Line is the oldest, continuously operated street car line in the world today.  Since 1835, street railway cars have rounded Lee Circle and headed up St. Charles Avenue to Carrollton.  It is one of the last surviving examples of an era in which street railways were one of the major forms of public transit contributing greatly to the development of Urban America.

New Orleans, Louisiana – Garden District – Col. Short’s Villa

23 Jun

Prytania Street View of Col. Short's Villa

Located at Fourth St. and Prytania, in the Historic Garden District of New Orleans, this beautiful home has  a number  of items of historical interest attached to it. It was designed by Henry Howard  and built by Robert Huyghe for Robert Short in 1859.

One of the most unique features of this home is not the house itself but the fence.  It is a cast iron fence with a design of intertwined morning glories growing with the corn stalks. The fence was erected by Wood & Mitenberger, the New Orleans branch of the Philadelphia foundry of Wood and Perot.  Wood and Perot also cast the corn fence located in the French Quarter.

Legend has it that Col. Short’s wife was lonely for her native Iowa and so Short had the fence made for her.  Another source says that the Short’s simply ordered it from the company catalog. Outside of the two corn fences in New Orleans and I am not aware of another in the U.S. or one that is at least a tourist attraction.

Fourth Street View of Corn Fence at the Col. Short Villa

Before the occupation of New Orleans, by the Union Forces, Col. Short returned to his native Kentucky.  As a result his property was seized on September 1, 1863.  Short was classified as an “Absent Rebel” even though his wife still occupied the house.

Close Up View of Col. Short's Villa

She was ousted from the house in March of 1864 and General Butler turned it into the Executive Mansion for newly elected Federal Governor Mr. Michael Hahn.  Two weeks later The U.S. Commander, Department of the Gulf, Major General Nathaniel Banks and family became the new residents.

On August 15, 1865 the property was returned to Col. Short by the U.S. Government.  He remained a resident here until his death in 1890.